The ‘C’ Word

The word ‘curiosity’ seems to be cropping up in all my conversations regarding the slide collection – it might be beginning to bore some people. However, I think it’s this particular ingredient which is central to generating an exciting and dynamic subject area and department. We are all guilty of apathy at some point or another, but we should at least be curious [there it is again] about the diverse topics and objects which are available for us to explore and research (or just simply enjoy).

It’s been suggested that the shift from analogue to digital culture means we no longer require such collections – that the internet and beloved ‘Google’ offers all we could possibly require in terms of visual culture. However, although the internet and digital culture may indeed offer variety at the touch of a mouse, the images and artworks contained with such a vast collection as AHVS slide library vastly outweighs that of any online source. Likewise, you will never find such works placed together within one internet site, or indeed text-book. The slide collection is thus a physical, visual encyclopedia. Unlike books or the internet, there is an inclusiveness to a slide collection.

As so eloquently stated by Althea Greenan of the Women’s Art Library, Goldsmiths:

“The process of photographing artwork, processing film, slide-mounting and labeling, suggests that the 35mm slide is a mode of image publication that has no direct equivalent today. The individual slides have physical attributes that add a layer of meaning to art documentation which takes on a different significance when accumulated into a large collection.” [A. Greenan, What can a slide collection do besides represent artwork? (2011), p. 3]

She asks crucial questions of the Women’s Art Library slide collection, which are wholly relevant for to AHVS collection: ‘How does the slide collection personalize the art experience? […] Why keep a slide collection? […]What is different about the experience of art through a slide collection to the experience of art through digital image databases? What is changed when a slide is no longer projectable?[…] What can an art slide collection do besides represent artwork?’ (Greenan, p.5, 11)

It is these kinds of questions I am constantly considering when searching through the collection when thinking about how we can use the slides as a resource within teaching. Yes, we may not always use the slides to physically project images – although there are many which could, and should, still be used; but it is the information which is contained within the collection which interests me – the vast numbers of artists and designers which never get considered because we just ‘forget’ they exist if not included within the teaching timetable

Returning to the ‘c’ word once again: I want students to be curious about their subject area; to want to glean more knowledge than what they already possess have as they hit ‘Google’. Curiosity leads to the unexpected; it leads us to new knowledge. Take advantage of resources which offer such opportunities.

 

 

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